Updates

It’s Day 7: Last day to opt-out of Education Minnesota under union terms

Today is the last day that teachers and ESPs in Minnesota can resign according to the terms of the union card. This is your choice. The Supreme Court said you have to give your affirmative consent. This means you can resign without paying any fees or losing your job, but for now you are limited to the 7-day window. There is still time to resign.

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It’s Day 6: Postmark your letter by today (Saturday)

Educated Teachers recommends that you send your resignation letter, opting-out of the union, via the U.S. mail to Education Minnesota, then follow up with an email. The instructions and help with the letter are here. And get it in the mail, ideally postmarked today.

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Education Minnesota Telling Teachers Who did not Sign Form They are Members

The union needs to have written proof of membership to be in compliance with the Janus decision. The union is telling teachers who have NOT signed the card that they are members in good standing. You do not need to sign to keep your job. If you have signed a card, you can still resign over the next few days.

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It’s Day 5: What we are hearing from teachers during the 7-day opt-out week

Remember as the 7-day window comes to a close this weekend: the U.S. Supreme Court said in Janus that this is your choice. If you resign, you do not have to fund the union with fair-share fees or any other fees. But, again, you can voluntarily support your local without becoming a member. It is up to the local whether to accept your gracious gesture. 

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It’s Day 4: There are liability coverage options outside of the union

Minnesota teachers want protection against allegations that could threaten their career. And in the wake of the Janus decision, teacher associations want educators to know they have options for excellent liability insurance.

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Teachers: You do not need to meet with your local union rep to opt-out this week

Minnesota teachers who are choosing to exercise their First Amendment rights and resign from union membership are being told they need to meet with their local union official before they can opt-out. This meeting is not required under the law, teacher contract, or under the union membership card.

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Workplace Democracy? Today’s K-12 teachers did not vote for Education Minnesota.

Given that most of the teachers’ local unions were recognized in the 1970s, the percentage of teachers in the classroom today who voted for (or against) the current union representation is zero, or nearly so. When you accept a teaching job in Minnesota, you accept the exclusive representation of the union whether you are a member or not. If you do not, you do not get the job.

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By the Numbers: Union Executive Pay, Dues and Membership

Denise Specht, President of Education Minnesota makes over $206,000 a year. Specht's gross salary increased $5,794 in 2016. Almost 70 executives and other staff at Education Minnesota make over $100,000 in salary. State dues have gone up by $7; dues range from $650 to $1,400. There were 6,534 reported agency fee payers in 2017.

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How many teachers need to resign before the union takes notice, does a better job?

We do think if enough teachers exercise their right to resign from the union, that the union is more likely to do a better job representing all teachers; and that would be a good thing. What is “enough?” We do not know. But if very few teachers resign, Education Minnesota is unlikely to shift its focus away from politics and on to the every-day issues faced by teachers in the classroom and as professionals.

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