Janus v AFSCME

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Teachers, do you know your rights?

Despite the rights of teachers being restored in the Janus v. AFSCME decision, many are unaware of what these rights are. Teachers are also hearing a lot of misinformation concerning the Janus decision and what it means for them. The Teacher Freedom project has created a Declaration of Educator Association Rights

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The Janus Effect on Teachers’ Union: Too Soon to Know

The impact of Janus v. AFSCME on union membership losses in Minnesota is not fully known yet. While the state’s unionization rate in the public sector did increase 5.4 percentage points between 2017 and 2018, not all union data is reported within a calendar year.

For example, Education Minnesota, the…

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Report reveals how Minnesota teachers are trapped by arbitrary union terms, forcing them to fund Education Minnesota’s partisan political spending

(Golden Valley, MN) A report released by Center of the American Experiment reveals how Minnesota teachers are trapped by arbitrary union terms, forcing them to fund Education Minnesota’s partisan political spending even after the Janus decision.

Last June, the U.S. Supreme Court in Janus v. Afscme said that public employers can no longer collect…

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NEA Convention by the Numbers from Mike Antonucci

Forward: Mike Antonucci is an amazing reporter in the teachers’ union space. We do not think anyone spends more time watching the union for teachers, and he always seems to get great “scoops.” If you want to keep an eye on the teachers’ unions here and around the country, he…

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Teachers Union Details Political Strategy in Star Tribune, Raises Dues and PAC Contribution

Meanwhile, the union was anticipating the Supreme Court’s ruling and subsequently, a possible drop in membership. To maintain its numbers, Education Minnesota would need to fortify its membership and bank accounts. Last year, the union increased the amount deducted from each member’s annual union dues for its political action committee from $15 to $25. (If members want to opt out of that donation, they have to jump through a few hoops: Fill out a form included in an issue of the union’s magazine — and not a photocopied version — and submit it by the end of October, or within 30 days of signing on as a union member.)

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Can I still resign from the Union?

Education Minnesota only allows teacher and ESP members to resign or "opt-out" of union membership and dues deductions during a narrow 7-day window that just closed Sunday night, September 30. What if you missed that window? Any public employee who wishes to resign from the union, and end the deduction of union fees, is free to use this website to generate a resignation letter. 

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It’s Day 7: Last day to opt-out of Education Minnesota under union terms

Today is the last day that teachers and ESPs in Minnesota can resign according to the terms of the union card. This is your choice. The Supreme Court said you have to give your affirmative consent. This means you can resign without paying any fees or losing your job, but for now you are limited to the 7-day window. There is still time to resign.

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Education Minnesota Telling Teachers Who did not Sign Form They are Members

The union needs to have written proof of membership to be in compliance with the Janus decision. The union is telling teachers who have NOT signed the card that they are members in good standing. You do not need to sign to keep your job. If you have signed a card, you can still resign over the next few days.

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How many teachers need to resign before the union takes notice, does a better job?

We do think if enough teachers exercise their right to resign from the union, that the union is more likely to do a better job representing all teachers; and that would be a good thing. What is “enough?” We do not know. But if very few teachers resign, Education Minnesota is unlikely to shift its focus away from politics and on to the every-day issues faced by teachers in the classroom and as professionals.

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